June 2017 not as wet as in 2016

Close-up Australian magpie

Thieving Magpie

The month began cool, but became warm in the second half. The only unusual daily temperature was the early morning reading of 12.0° on the 29th, 10.0° above normal. There were ten frosts, when there are normally thirteen. On several mornings there was fog in the valley.
Seven days (normally six) registered rain over 0.2 mm. Significant falls came around the 12th and the 29th. On the 29th, the reading was 23.4 mm, but the rain extended over more than one day, totalling 39 mm. It was neither steady nor heavy, but unusually persistent. At Tamworth, rain fell in 27 hours out of 30.

Weather log for June 2017

Comparing June months

June of 2016 had been the wettest and most cloudy of the new century, with warm nights and cold days to match. This June, while moist, was close to normal. It was very like June 2015 and June 2014.
The month’s total rainfall of 62.8 mm was at the 75th percentile, well above the June average of 44 mm. There are no shortages of rainfall for groups of months to this date.

Climate for June months


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available. Since that gauge records “0.2 mm” on many rainless days, I cannot call those days rain days if the monthly count of rain days is not to show a sudden jump to record-breaking numbers.

All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

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3-year trends to January 2016

Parametric plots of smoothed climate variables at Manilla
“January 2016: moist again”

Trends to January 2016

January raw anomaly data (orange)

In January 2016, raw values for nearly all anomalies moved well towards the cool and moist corner of the graphs.

 Fully smoothed data (red)

In the latest month with fully smoothed data (July 2015) anomalies were quite small, but were moving towards warm and dry. Partially smoothed data points for more recent months show that the warm and dry “El Nino” influence on values around October and November was smaller than it seemed at first. In particular, rainfall did not go below the “normal” range, but the anomaly of daily minimum temperature rose quite high.


Note:

Fully smoothed data – Gaussian smoothing with half-width 6 months – are plotted in red, partly smoothed data uncoloured, and raw data for the last data point in orange. January data points are marked by squares.
Blue diamonds and the dashed blue rectangle show the extreme values in the fully smoothed data record since September 1999.

Normal values are based on averages for the decade from March 1999.* They appear on these graphs as a turquoise (turquoise) circle at the origin (0,0). A range of anomalies called “normal” is shown by a dashed rectangle in aqua (aqua). For values in degrees, the assigned normal range is +/-0.7°; for cloudiness, +/-7%; for monthly rainfall, +/-14 mm.

 * Normal values for rainfall are based on averages for the 125 years beginning 1883.

Winter 2015 like winter 2014

A low-level lenticular cloud

Low Level Lennie

Weather log for winter 2014There was one short spell of rather cold days in mid-July this year, and another at the very end of August.
Otherwise, this winter was very like the winter before. In mid-June and late August there were humid spells with heavy rain and very warm nights. By contrast, early August had cold nights with very low humidity and no rain. In both years, July had very light falls of rain.
The number of frosts in each season (38; 42) was near normal (44), but in this winter the coldest night (minus 2.1°) was the warmest so far this century.

Weather log for winter 2015

Like last winter, the average night temperature and the cloudiness were a little high, and the dew point very low. Average day temperature was half a degree low, making the daily temperature range narrow.
The winter rainfall, 133 mm, was just above the average (125 mm) and in the 62nd percentile.

Climate for winter 2015


 Temperature, including subsoil at 750 mm, and other data are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

Cloudy autumn in 2015

Photo of eucalyptus tree

Eucalyptus albens in bloom

For a time around the 20th of April, days averaged five degrees colder than normal. At that time nights were warm, making the daily temperature range a remarkable eight degrees less than normal. On three occasions the dew point (humidity) was down by six degrees or more: early and late in March, and in mid-May. The sub-soil temperature was low most of the time by up to half a degree, but ended one degree high. Rain fell in each fortnight. The number of rain days (19) was high, but the highest daily reading (26 mm) was normal. Weather log for autumn 2015 This autumn, like the last, was moist. The rainfall, at 137.5 mm, was a little higher (on the 60th percentile) and the mean daily temperature range was a new record narrow value of only 14.0°. The season was very cloudy, with 41% cloudy mornings, but did not beat last year’s record 48%. The early morning dew point, 7.2°, was not even up to normal (8.5°). Warm nights and cool days made the mean temperature normal. Climate for autumn 2015


 Temperature, including subsoil at 750 mm, and other data are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

3-year trends to April 2015

Parametric plots of smoothed climate variables at Manilla
“April 2015: equable”

Trends to April 2015

  April raw anomaly data (orange)

In April, daily maximum temperature anomaly became very low (-2.1°) while daily minimum temperature anomaly remained high (+0.7°). Other anomalies, except subsoil temperature, moved down the graphs, showing moist conditions. The extremely low temperature range anomaly (-3.0°) shows that the climate was equable, as it had been in the spring of 2010 (a smoothed record value).

Fully smoothed data (red)

The latest fully-smoothed data anomalies (October 2014) moved little, being warm and slightly dry.

Loops in the subsoil anomaly graph

The parametric plot of subsoil temperature anomaly against that of daily maximum temperature (bottom right) shows several clockwise loops. That is, peaks or troughs of subsoil temperature precede those of daily maximum (air) temperature by a month or more. This is not what one would expect. Indeed, where graphs of these variables earlier in this sixteen-year record show such loops, they are always anti-clockwise. Subsoil temperature anmalies lag those of daily maximum air temperature. See the graphs for August 2002, August 2004, August 2006, August 2008, May 2010, and April 2012.

In the last mentioned graph, the three extreme points included show no lag between the two variables. That period, from early 2009 to late 2011 marks the transition from a stable regime of subsoil temperature lagging daily maximum air temperature to the current regime of subsoil temperature leading daily maximum air temperature.


Note:

Fully smoothed data – Gaussian smoothing with half-width 6 months – are plotted in red, partly smoothed data uncoloured, and raw data for the last data point in orange. January data points are marked by squares.
Blue diamonds and the dashed blue rectangle show the extreme values in the fully smoothed data record since September 1999.

Normal values are based on averages for the decade from March 1999.* They appear on these graphs as a turquoise (turquoise) circle at the origin (0,0). A range of anomalies called “normal” is shown by a dashed rectangle in aqua (aqua). For values in degrees, the assigned normal range is +/-0.7°; for cloudiness, +/-7%; for monthly rainfall, +/-14 mm.

 * Normal values for rainfall are based on averages for the 125 years beginning 1883.