January 2018 hot and dry

Brushtail possum resting

Brushtail Possum

The first heat wave of the month was nearly five degrees above normal: a little worse than last January’s. Rain, mainly on the 12th, brought a cool spell with very dry air. A second heat wave was not so bad, and it was gone by the 31st.
Three days went over 40° (but January 2003 had five) and three nights did not go below 25° (a January record).
Rain fell on five days (usually seven), the highest reading being 15 mm.

Weather log for January 2018

Comparing January months

The average temperature this January (27.9°) was not as high as last January (28.7°), or even January 2013 (28.2°). The days (36.2°) were second hottest after 2017 (36.4°), but the nights (19.7°) were only fourth hottest.
The estimated rainfall of 20.6 mm was low: at the 11th percentile, and only one quarter of the January average (87 mm). However, there are still no serious rainfall shortages. The lowest percentile value (12th percentile) is the five-year total of 2760 mm, which is 440 mm below the normal five-year total of 3200 mm.

Climate in January months


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available, but it is not.  The gauge last reported on 24 September 2017.

All data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

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December 2017 as in 2016

Blooms of San Pedro Cactus at Manilla NSW

San Pedro Cactus 2017

The weather in this December was very like the weather a year ago. Even details were similar. Each had just one 40° day. Each had one night near 25°, about 9° above normal. This December had one hot spell 6.3° above normal: last December had two hot spells 4.8° and 3.6° above normal. Neither had cool spells.
This December’s highest rainfall reading, 15.5 mm (unofficial), was like last December’s 17.8 mm (also unofficial). This month had fewer rain days (5 vs. 12) and longer dry spells.

Weather log for December 2017

Comparing December months

This was one of the hottest Decembers in the new century. The mean daily maximum, at 33.7°, equals that of December 2005, but is beaten by 33.8° last December. The mean daily minimum, at 18.2°, equals that of last December, but is not as warm as the 18.6° of December 2009. By contrast, December 2011 was the coldest, with a mean maximum of only 27.0°, and a mean minimum of only 13.9°.
This month’s subsoil temperature (23.0°) was very cool; one of four December values more than a degree below normal.
Like last December, this month was not very moist, but not very sunny either.
The rainfall of 48.2 mm was practically the same as in December 2016 and 2013. It is at the 35th percentile: not high, but high enough to prevent shortages.

Climate in December months

The Year 2017 was warm and dry

In this record (2000 to 2017), Manilla’s average annual temperature this year (18.65°) shows it to be the third warmest, after 2014 (19.01°) and 2009 (18.85°). The coolest was 2008 (17.19°), which was also cool globally. (Apart from 2008, Manilla annual temperatures do not follow global temperatures closely: the hottest year globally (2016) was not a very warm year here.)
Like the previous two years, 2017 had night temperatures half a degree below the normal value. Day temperatures, which had been near normal in 2015 and 2016, became a degree warmer. This year’s subsoil temperature (19.80°) was cool, very much cooler than in 2013 (22.19°).

It was a year of very low rainfall: 517 mm, which is at the 20th percentile, and 135 mm below the average (652 mm). Three even lower rainfall totals have occurred in the last sixteen years: 366 mm in 2002 (2nd percentile), 495 mm in 2009 (16th percentile), and 447 mm in 2014 (8th percentile).
Manilla yearly rainfall history: four momentsThis unusually high ratio of very dry years agrees with other patterns seen in Manilla’s annual rainfall. That is, in the moments of the frequency distributions. Recently, Manilla’s annual rainfall has had (i) very high kurtosis, showing increased extremes (“fat tails”), and (ii) negative skewness, showing that these extremes are low extremes, not high extremes.


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available, but it is not.  The gauge last reported on 24 September 2017.

All data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

November 2017 dry again with cold nights

Cockatoos feeding in a wattle

Corellas in Acacia decora

While day temperatures were normal, many nights were below normal, around 10°. The cold night air was extremely dry. The early morning dew point on the 1st was minus 3.6°, about 14° below normal.
My rain gauge registered seven rain days, but readings were moderate, the highest being 14.0 mm on the 30th. (The automatic gauge at the Museum remained down.)

Weather log for November 2017

Comparing November months

With a mean of 20.8°, this month was cool, but not as cool as several other November months. November 1999, at 19.4°, was the coolest. On the graph, November 2014 (25.4°) stands out as very much warmer.
The rainfall of 44.2 mm is at the 31st percentile: not high, but enough to prevent any shortages. This graph still includes November 2011, the wettest on record. At 242.9 mm, it beat a record of 226 mm that had stood for fifty years.

Climate log for November


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available.  The gauge last reported on 24 September 2017.

All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

October 2017: no drought

Grevillea robusta flowers

Flowers of Silky Oak

No temperatures were extreme in this month. In the second week, the mean weekly temperature was four degrees above normal, rather like the last week of September.
Dry air on the 6th and on the 31st made the dew point eight degrees low, but humid air on the 11th made it seven degrees high.
My rain gauge registered six rain days, with high readings of 38.5 mm on the 9th, 22.0 mm on the 12th, and 16.8 mm on the 21st. (The automatic gauge at the Museum remained down.)

Weather log for October 2017

Comparing October months

As shown by the arrow on the second graph, October months became warmer and more moist with each year from 2012 to 2015. October 2016 was very cool, then this month was again warm. The trend to more moisture continued through all six October months from 2012 to 2017. It was shown not only by rainfall, but also by cloudiness, dew point, and narrowing daily temperature range. No other calendar months had this trend.
The high total rainfall of 84.1 mm (80th percentile) wiped out the serious and severe rainfall shortages seen in September. Now, the lowest percentile value is that for the 4-month total (117 mm). Being at the 15th percentile, it does not rate as serious.

Climate for October


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available.  The gauge last reported on 24 September 2017.

All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

September 2017 even more arid

Trellised vine photo

Blooming Wonga-Wonga Vines

Despite more cloud, September was even more arid than August. Weekly temperatures remained normal until the last week, which was remarkably warm. There were some notable events. The 13th, the first 30°-day of the season, was followed by a day more than 16° cooler. Extremely low humidity early on the 20th made the dew point (-8.8°) almost as low as the record set last month. Among minimum overnight temperatures that were near zero, the one on the 24th (22.8°) set a record by being 14.7° higher than normal.
The number of frosts (below +2.2° in the screen) was 13 (a September record), almost as many as in August. Perhaps the frost on the 20th was the last of the season. That is the normal date for it.
There was 5.2 mm of rain on the 14th, and an estimated 0.3 mm on the 29th. (The automatic gauge at the Museum was down by then.)

Weather log

Comparing September months

The mean daily maximum of 25.0° was rather high, fully 5° higher than last year. With a mean daily minimum (5.7°) that was rather low, the daily temperature range reached the record wide value of 19.3°.
Extremely dry air was shown by a mean early-morning dew point of 2.7°, the lowest September value, 8.1° below normal.
The total rainfall of 5.5 mm (estimated) was very far below the September average (41 mm), at the 8th percentile. That is a serious rainfall shortage. The current rainfall totals for four months (95 mm) and for six months (175 mm) are also serious rainfall shortages. Even worse are the totals for two months (19 mm) and for three months (33 mm): they are severe rainfall shortages.
Similar severe shortages occurred in October 2013, May 2008, and May 2005. Extreme shortages last occurred in the six-month drought of 2002.

Climate graph for September


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available.  The gauge last reported on 24 September 2017.

All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

August 2017 arid and sunny

Photo of a honey-eater feeding

Noisy Miner in Emu Bush

Very few days in August were cloudy, and only one day, the 4th, had some rain: 13.6 mm. Extremely dry air produced a 21st-century record low dew point of minus 10.0 degrees on the 20th. The dry air and clear skies dried out the soil, and also made for wide ranges of temperature. Twelve days were more than 20° warmer than their nights. The actual temperatures, however, were not extreme. Weekly average temperatures remained normal until falling to 3.3° lower in the final days.
Frosts (below +2.2° in the screen) happened on 17 mornings, just two more than normal.

Weather log

Comparing August months

Arid August months like this occurred in 2012 and 2013, but not since then. The mean early morning dew points in 2012 (-2.2°) and this time (-2.8°) were record values, far below the normal value of +2.2°. This month was also very sunny, had little rain, and had a daily temperature range of 17.9°, a record for August.
Temperatures were close to normal. The daily maximum (19.8°) was a degree above normal, and the daily minimum (1.9°) was a degree below normal.
The total rainfall of 13.8 mm (20th percentile) was far below the August average (40 mm). Added to the low total for July (13.2 mm), the two-month total is only 27.0 mm, which is at the 6th percentile. That makes it the first serious rainfall shortage of any duration since October 2015, when the 30-month total had been at the 6th percentile. For two-month rainfall totals, there has not been such a shortage since nearly four years ago (September 2013).

Climate graph for August


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available. All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

July 2017 fine with cold nights

July morning photo of Manilla from the lookout

Manilla Prospect in July

Through most of the month, days were fine and sunny, but some days, mainly in the middle, were cloudy and some had a little rain. The highest reading, on the 16th, was only 7.4 mm.
No days were remarkable except the 28th which, at 23.7°, equalled the record for July set 31/07/14. It was 6.1° above normal.
Frosts (below +2.2° in the screen) happened on 23 mornings, 6 more than normal. However, the coldest morning, at -2.6°, was not nearly as cold as the record of -5.1° set in 2002.

Weather log

Comparing July months

Unlike July 2016, which had been cloudy with warm nights, this July was fine with cold nights. Days, at 18.1°, were not quite as warm as in July 2013 (18.9°), the warmest in the new century.
Moisture was scarce, as in the record-making July of 2002. Readings that reflected low moisture were:

Daily minimum temperature very low: +1.2° (2002: 0.9°);
Very many frosts: 23 (2002: 27);
Very low percentage of cloudy mornings: 29% (2002: 23%);
Very low early morning dew point: -1.4° (2002: -1.4°);
Very wide daily temperature range: 16.9° (2002: 18.5°);
Very low rainfall: 13.2 mm (2002: 1.0 mm).

Relative humidity in the early mornings, normally 90% in July, was 74%. That was the lowest July value in my 13-year record.
Despite the total rainfall of 13.2 mm (16th percentile) being far below the July average (41 mm), there are still no shortages of rainfall for groups of months. The most recent serious shortage was nearly two years ago. In October 2015, the 30-month total to that date (1216 mm) was still down at the 6th percentile. That shortage was carried over from an earlier extreme event: the 85 mm summer rainfall of 2013-14 that was 142 mm below average.

Climate graph for July


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available. All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.