Spring 2018 warm

Native vine blossoms

Wonga wonga in spring

This spring was marked by very high temperature in the first week of November. Both days and nights were about five degrees above normal, as hot as expected in mid-summer. Less extreme warmth also occurred in the second half of October and in the second week of September. Periods of very dry air (marked “ARID”) came in mid-September, late November, and at the time of very high temperature.
There were 23 rain days (normally 19), but there was one rainless period of 17 days in September. No day had more than 17 mm of rain.

Weather log spring 2018

The season’s rainfall of 114 mm was at the 24th percentile, about 50 mm below average (166 mm). [The highest rainfall on this graph, spring 2016, is only 45 mm above average.] Other measures of moisture this spring (cloud, dew point, and low daily temperature range) were similar to those of spring 2017 and 2016. They were much moister than those of spring 2013.
The season was warm, with days 0.5° above average and nights 1.5° above average. Spring 2016 had been three degrees cooler. The subsoil temperature was below normal, as it was in the three previous spring seasons.

Climate for spring 2018


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available. Station 55312 recorded no readings in spring 2018. I used my own readings for the whole season.

All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

November 2018 began hot

A King Parrot feeding in a Hopbush

King Parrot in Hop Bush

The month began hot, with the weekly temperature more than six degrees above normal. On the 6th, the maximum reached 39.4° after a warm overnight low of 22.1°. However, rain brought a maximum of only 21.5° on the 8th. In the rest of the month temperatures were near normal. Just one morning (the 24th) had an exceptionally low dew point that was 14° below normal.
There were eight rain days, with the highest reading 17.2 mm, on the 22nd.

Weather log November 2018

Comparing November months

Although the month began so hot, the average temperature (22.7°) was only 1° above normal, and not nearly as high as in November 2014 (25.4°) or November 2009 (26.0°).
Despite the continuing drought, the only indicator showing low moisture was the early morning dew point (7.3°). There was quite a lot of cloud (43%) and a rather narrow daily temperature range (14.4°).
The rainfall total of 50.2 mm (estimated) is at the 36th percentile for November, somewhat below the average (67 mm).
I have reported the drought in another post.

Climate in November months


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available.  The record was again defective in November 2018. No 9 am readings were recorded. I have substituted my non-standard gauge readings for all days.
All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

3-year trends to November 2018

Not So Moist

3-year trends to November 2018

November raw anomaly data (orange)

In November 2018, the top four graphs show that raw values of moisture anomalies moved up away from the moist values of October, but not as far as earlier drought values.
For temperature anomalies, daily maximum and subsoil rose again, while, daily minimum fell from its extremely high value

 Fully smoothed data (red)

At this time, Manilla was entering an extreme drought. Each of the smoothed climate anomalies shown on these graphs contributed to the drought to some degree, and with more or less lag.

By May 2018, the last date for which data can be fully smoothed (as described below), most variables had not yet peaked in their contribution. Several more months of data will reveal the complete cycle into and out of drought.
The anomaly of daily maximum temperature (x-axis, all graphs) had already peaked in March 2018. (In the 2002 drought daily maximum temperature had peaked after the peak of minimum rainfall, not before.)
In May 2018 the rainfall anomaly was still becoming more negative, to a record low value of minus 28.3 mm . June and July rainfall anomalies seemed likely to be similar after smoothing.
Cloudiness was decreasing towards a minimum (perhaps in August 2018) without becoming much less cloudy than normal.
Dew point anomaly was still decreasing, and seemed likely to reach a record low value about August.
The anomaly of daily temperature range had been at a (high) level characteristic of drought since the winter of 2017. It had changed little since, and seemed likely to peak in June 2018 without approaching the record value of July 2002.
The anomaly of daily minimum temperature has a cryptic relation to drought. In this case, the value peaked sharply in February 2018 before falling rapidly. It may have reached a minimum about August 2018.
The anomaly of subsoil temperature was rising rapidly in May 2018, and seemed likely to peak about July, lagging four months behind the daily maximum temperature anomaly.


Note:

Fully smoothed data – Gaussian smoothing with half-width 6 months – are plotted in red, partly smoothed data uncoloured, and raw data for the last data point in orange. January data points are marked by squares.
Blue diamonds and the dashed blue rectangle show the extreme values in the fully smoothed data record since September 1999.

Normal values are based on averages for the decade from March 1999.* They appear on these graphs as a turquoise (turquoise) circle at the origin (0,0). A range of anomalies called “normal” is shown by a dashed rectangle in aqua (aqua). For values in degrees, the assigned normal range is +/-0.7°; for cloudiness, +/-7%; for monthly rainfall, +/-14 mm.

 * Normal values for rainfall are based on averages for the 125 years beginning 1883.

November Drought Gets Longer

In November 2018, the drought faded in the short term, but became worse in the long term.

Rainfall Oct Nov 2018 Manilla

Graph of Rainfall Shortages

This graph shows all the present rainfall shortages at Manilla, short term and long term, in terms of percentile values. The latest values, as at the end of October, are shown by a black line with black circles. Those from one month earlier, at the end of October, are shown by a thinner line with smaller white circles.

Changes this month

November rainfall was almost normal at 50.2 mm, further raising the totals for 2, 3, 4, and 5 months, so they did not qualify as serious shortages. The 6-month total of 156 mm qualified as a serious shortage.
The remaining extreme shortages were at 9 months (201 mm) and 18 months (564 mm).

Worsening long-term shortages

Rainfall totals for periods from 72 months to 360 months (6 years to 30 years) are now all below normal. In decades before September 2017 those totals had been normal. (See the September 2017 plot on the graph in this earlier post.)

Three of the current data points are far below normal. The 7-year total (3935 mm) is a severe (almost extreme) shortage, not seen since 1946. The 120-month (10-year) total (5986 mm) is a serious shortage, not seen since 1967. Similarly, the 240-month (20-year) total is a serious shortage, not seen since 1949.
Such long-term rainfall shortages were common early in the 20th century. They have hardly occurred since the Keepit Dam was built in 1960.


Further Explanation

Drought 2018 contour chartMuch more detail was given in the post: “Contours of Manilla’s 2018 Drought” (with data up to October only). Notes include: “Long-term shortages”, “Classes of rainfall shortage”, and “Manilla rainfall records”.

An Extreme 24-month Drought

The 830 mm of rain that fell in the last 24-months is the lowest in 50 years.

Rainfall shortages September and October 2018 at Manilla

Graph of Rainfall Shortages

This graph shows all the present rainfall shortages at Manilla, short term and long term, in terms of percentile values. The latest values, as at the end of October, are shown by a black line with black circles. Those from one month earlier, at the end of September, are shown by a thinner line with smaller white circles.

Changes this month

October rainfall that was normal (51.6 mm) also raised the totals for 2 months and 3 months, so they did not qualify as serious shortages. The 4-month total of 101 mm just qualified.
Extreme shortages formed a new pattern. In September, two values had been exceptionally low: the 6-month total had been the third lowest ever, and the 15-month total had been the lowest. By October, no rainfall was far below the 1st percentile value. They clustered at 12 months, 15 months, 18 months and 24 months.
As the 24-month rainfall shortage was extreme (below 840 mm), this became the worst 24-month drought in half a century. Extreme 24-month droughts had come in 1902, 1913, 1946, and 1966, but never since.


Further Explanation

Much more detail was given with last month’s graph of rainfall shortages, in the post: “Record 15-month Drought in 2018”. Notes include: “Long-term shortages”, “Classes of rainfall shortage”, and “Manilla rainfall records”.


Drought development plot

Drought 2018 contour chartThe development of the 2018 drought at Manilla is shown in the post “Contours of Manilla’s 2018 Drought”. The graph there shows contours of drought severity plotted against date and duration.

Moist October 2018

Green grass in a drought

Greenness that thickens

No temperatures were extreme, but many nights were warm. The weekly temperatures were three or four degrees high after the middle of the month. The sunniest days had low early morning dew points.
There were eight rain days, with the highest reading 15 mm, on the 11th.

Weather log, October 2018

Comparing October months

While the mean temperature (20.3°) was just above normal, this month was as moist as October 2017. Despite the continuing drought, the daily temperature range was low (14.9°), the cloudiness high (52%), and the dew point high (7.2°).
The rainfall total of 51.6 mm (estimated) is at the 45th percentile for October, not far below average (58 mm).
I have reported the drought in another post (“Contours of Manilla’s 2018 Drought”).

Climate in October months


Data. A Bureau of Meteorology automatic rain gauge operates in the museum yard. From 17 March 2017, 9 am daily readings are published as Manilla Museum, Station 55312.  These reports use that rainfall data when it is available.  The record was again defective in October 2018. No 9am readings were recorded. I have substituted my non-standard gauge readings for all days.
All other data, including subsoil at 750 mm, are from 3 Monash Street, Manilla.

3-year trends to October 2018

Moist

3-year trends to October 2018

October raw anomaly data (orange)

In October 2018, raw values of three anomalies moved low on the graphs, showing more moisture . They were: cloudy days percent, dew point, and (narrow) daily temperature range. Rainfall increased from very low back to normal.
For temperatures, daily maximum fell to normal, daily minimum rose extremely high, and subsoil temperature fell very low.

 Fully smoothed data (red)

Fully smoothed data for April 2018 did not break the previous month’s record for daily maximum temperature anomaly (x-axis), as I had thought it would.
The April smoothed rainfall anomaly of minus 27.8 mm (top left graph) beat the 21st-century record minus value of 27.1 mm set in July 2002.
In April 2018, the trend for decreasing rainfall with increasing daily maximum temperature (top left graph), which had had lasted eight months, altered as temperature began to fall.. At that date, the three other moisture anomaly variables were moving rapidly up the graphs towards drought.
Daily minimum temperature anomaly was falling from a recent maximum in February. Subsoil temperature anomaly continued its sustained rapid rise.


Note:

Fully smoothed data – Gaussian smoothing with half-width 6 months – are plotted in red, partly smoothed data uncoloured, and raw data for the last data point in orange. January data points are marked by squares.
Blue diamonds and the dashed blue rectangle show the extreme values in the fully smoothed data record since September 1999.

Normal values are based on averages for the decade from March 1999.* They appear on these graphs as a turquoise (turquoise) circle at the origin (0,0). A range of anomalies called “normal” is shown by a dashed rectangle in aqua (aqua). For values in degrees, the assigned normal range is +/-0.7°; for cloudiness, +/-7%; for monthly rainfall, +/-14 mm.

 * Normal values for rainfall are based on averages for the 125 years beginning 1883.