Courtyard wicket gates

Courtyard wicket gate half open

View East Through Wicket Gate

This small courtyard has been described on its own page: “A Heat-control Courtyard”.

Built to help control the indoor climate, it is enclosed by solid walls and solid gates made of a sandwich of fibre and polystyrene.
At times when free circulation of air is wanted, the gates can be latched open. That has the disadvantage that dogs and small children can pass in and out.
I have now made the control of air separate from the control of traffic by adding a wicket gate in each gateway.

The first photo (above) is a view of the courtyard as one would enter it from the west. Both main gates are open. The west wicket gate stands partly open, and the east wicket gate is closed.

Courtyard wicket gate bolted open.

West solid gate closed and wicket gate bolted open.

The second photo, taken from just inside the courtyard, shows the west main gate closed to prevent the flow of air. The wicket gate is fully open, as it would be in that case, secured there by its drop bolt.

Courtyard seen through the east wicket gate

Courtyard through east wicket gate

 

 

 

 

In the third photo, the courtyard is seen through the open east main gate and the bars of the closed east wicket gate.

These photos were taken on the 1st of August 2017 at 10:30 am. They show the courtyard receiving sunshine that passes over the roof of the house, as it does during winter mornings. Some sunshine is direct, some reflecting diffusely off the wall, and some reflecting brightly off mirrors of aluminium foil.

Two thermometer screens can be seen in the third photo. I am monitoring temperatures to find if the courtyard is affecting the indoor climate. As an experiment, I keep the main gates open or closed in alternate months. When gates were open in a particular month of the first year, they are closed in that month of the next year.


The wicket gates are made of welded, pre-galvanised steel tube in the style “Pool’nPlay Flattop”, powder-coated in white. They were supplied and installed in July 2017 by Bluedog Fences for $1793.

My Heat-control Courtyard

Photo of a small courtyard

A Heat-control Courtyard

I have added a courtyard to my high-mass solar-passive house to improve summer cooling and winter heating.

Photo of building materials

Courtyard Wall Panels and Gates

The courtyard extends 13 metres along the south wall of the house. It is completely enclosed by a wall of white-painted polystyrene sandwich panels 1.8 metres high, with two gates of the same material.

By September 2015 trenches had been dug for the courtyard foundation, and by December it was complete.

Photo of trenches dug for courtyard

Courtyard Trenches, West

Photo of trenches dug for courtyard

Courtyard Trenches, East

Operation

This house is in BCA Climate Zone 4: Hot dry summer, cool winter. For comfort, it must be made very much cooler in summer and very much warmer in winter. The courtyard was built to help to achieve both results without the use of heaters or coolers.
In summer, it should ensure a supply of very cool air at night. In this house, cool air is drawn in to replace warm air that flows out the clear-story windows by the stack effect, assisted by fans. By day, the courtyard walls also block some solar radiation.

Photo of courtyard from the west

The Courtyard Through The Western Gate

In winter, the white courtyard wall reflects sunshine north towards the house, and re-radiates heat lost from the house wall back towards it.

More

Much more detail is given in the page “A Heat-control Courtyard”. All photos on this topic are in a gallery in “House Photos – 2016”.

New Post on Wicket Gates

In August 2017 I added a new post about wicket gates that were added to the solid gates in the courtyard gateways.


To invite discussion of how courtyards can affect indoor and outdoor climate of houses, I opened a thread “Courtyards for Climate Control” on the forum of the Alternative Technology Association (ATA) based in Melbourne.